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About Durham

Durham, England

 

 

Durham Cathedral and the River Wear
Durham Cathedral and the River Wear

 

 

Durham is a historic city and the county town of County Durham in North East England. The city sits on the River Wear, to the south of Newcastle upon Tyne and to the north of Darlington. Durham is well known for its Norman cathedral and 11th century castle, both designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986. The castle has been the home of Durham University since 1832. HM Prison Durham is also located close to the city centre.

 

 

 

 

Name

 

 

 

Durham Cathedral and castle as seen from the river bank whilst a boat race takes place between University College, Durham and Newcastle University

 

 

 

 

The name "Durham" comes from the Old English "dun", meaning hill fort, and the Old Norse "holme", which translates to island. The Lord Bishop of Durham takes a Latin variation of the city's name in his official signature, which is signed "N. Dunelm". Some attribute the city's name to the legend of the Dun Cow and the milkmaid who in legend guided the monks of Lindisfarne carrying the body of Saint Cuthbert to the site of the present city in 995 AD. Dun Cow Lane is said to be one of the first streets in Durham, being directly to the east of Durham Cathedral and taking its name from a depiction of the city's founding etched in masonry on the south side of the cathedral. The city has been known by a number of names throughout history. The original Nordic Dun Holm was changed to Duresme by the Normans and was known in Latinas Dunelm. The modern form Durham came into use later in the city's history. The north eastern historianRobert Surtees chronicled the name changes in his History and Antiquities of the County Palatine of Durham but states that it is an "impossibility" to tell when the city's modern name came into being.

 

 

 

 

Geography

 

Durham is situated 13 miles (21 km) to the south west of Sunderland. The River Wear flows north through the city, making an incised meander which encloses the centre on three sides to form Durham's peninsula.

The county town of County Durham, until 2009 Durham was located in the City of Durham local government district, which extended beyond the city, and had a total population of 87,656 in 2001, covering 186.68 square kilometres in 2007. In 2001, the unparished area of Durham had a population of 29,091, whilst the built-up area of Durham had a population of 42,939.

There are three old roads out of the Market Place: Saddler Street heads south-east, towards Elvet Bridge, the Bailey and Prebends Bridge. Elvet Bridge leads to the Elvet area of the city, Durham Prison and the south; Prebends Bridge is smaller and provides access from the Bailey to south Durham. Heading west, Silver Street leads out of the Market Place towards Framwellgate Bridge and North Road, the other main shopping area of the city. From here, the city spreads out into the Framwelgate, Crossgate, Neville's Cross and viaduct districts, which are largely residential areas. Beyond the viaduct lie the outlying districts of Framwellgate Moor and Neville's Cross. Heading north from the Market Place leads to Claypath. The road curves back round to the east and beyond it lieGilesgate, Gilesgate Moor and Dragonville.

 


 

 

Landmarks

 

 

The whole of the centre of Durham is designated a conservation area. The conservation area was first designated on 9 August 1968, and was extended on 25 November 1980.  In addition to the Cathedral and Castle, Durham contains over 630 listed buildings, 569 of which are located within the city centre conservation area. 

 

 

Grade I listed

 

 

 

 

Grade II* listed

 

 

  • Aykley Heads House (now Bistro 21)
  • Bishop Cosin's Hall, Palace Green
  • Cosin's Library (now part of University Library, Palace Green)
  • Crown Court, Old Elvet
  • St Cuthbert's Society, 12 South Bailey
  • St John's College, 3 South Bailey
  • St Oswald's Church
  • Railway viaduct, North Road
  • Town Hall and Guildhall, Market Place
  • Durham Marriott Hotel Royal County, Old Elvet


 

Grade II listed

 

  • Durham Observatory
  • The Chapel of the College of St Hild and St Bede
  • The Victoria, a public house at 86 Hallgarth Street
  • and a great many others


 

Durham Cathedral

 

 

The Cathedral Church of Christ, Blessed Mary the Virgin and St Cuthbert of Durham, commonly referred to as Durham Cathedral was founded in its present form in AD 1093 and remains a centre for Christian worship today. It is generally regarded as one of the finest Romanesque cathedrals in Europe and the rib vaulting in the nave marks the beginning of Gothic ecclesiastical architecture. The cathedral has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site along with nearby Durham Castle, which faces it across Palace Green, high above the River Wear.

The cathedral houses the shrine and related treasures of Cuthbert of Lindisfarne, and these are on public view. It is also home to the head of St Oswald of Northumbria and the remains of the Venerable Bede.


 

 

 

Durham Castle

 

 

 

Durham Castle, view of the keep

 

 

 

 

The castle was originally built in the 11th century as a projection of the Norman power in Northern England, as the population of England in the north remained rebellious following the disruption of the Norman Conquestin 1066. It is an excellent example of the early motte and bailey castles favoured by the Normans. The holder of the office of Bishop of Durham was appointed by the King to exercise royal authority on his behalf and the castle was the centre of his command.

It remained the Bishop's Palace for the Bishops of Durham until the Bishop William Van Mildert madeBishop Auckland their primary residence. A founder of Durham University, Van Mildert gave the castle as accommodation for the institution's first college, University College. The castle was famed for its vast Great Hall, created by Bishop Antony Bek in the early 14th century. It was the largest great hall in Britain until Bishop Richard Foxe shortened it at the end of the 15th century. However, it is still 46 feet high and over 33 yards long. The castle is still the home of University College, Durham (which is, as a result, known informally as "Castle"). It has been in continuous use for over 900 years and is the only castle in the United Kingdom never to have suffered a breach.

 

 

 

Education

 

 

Durham University

 

 

Durham is home to Durham University. It was founded as the University of Durham (which remains its official and legal name)  by Act of Parliament in 1832 and granted a Royal Charter in 1837. It was one of the first universities to open in England for more than 600 years, and is claimed to be England's third oldest after the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge. Durham University has an international reputation for excellence and its graduates are much sought after.

 

 

Primary schools include:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durham,_England

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