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About Winchester

Winchester



Winchester is a city and the county town of Hampshire. The city lies at the heart of the wider City of Winchester, a local government district, and is located at the western end of the South Downs National Park, along the course of the River Itchen.It is situated 68 miles (109 km) south-west of London and 13.6 miles (21.9 km) from Southampton, its other closest city. At the time of the 2001 Census, Winchester had a population of 41,420.

Winchester developed from the Roman town of Venta Belgarum, which developed from an Iron Age oppidum. Winchester's major landmark is Winchester Cathedral, one of the largest cathedrals in Europe, with the distinction of having the longest nave and overall length of all Gothic cathedrals in Europe. The city is also home to the University of Winchester and Winchester College the oldest public school in the United Kingdom still to be using its original buildings. The city's architectural and historic interest, and its fast links to other towns and cities have led Winchester to become one of the most expensive and desirable areas of the country. The demonym for a person from Winchester is "Wintonian".



Winchester 13.JPG
    
     Winchester city centre from St Giles's Hill 




Landmarks



Cathedral



Winchester Cathedral was originally built in 1079 and remains the longest cathedral in Europe. It contains much fine architecture spanning the 11th to the 16th century and is the place of interment of numerous Bishops of Winchester (such as William of Wykeham), Anglo-Saxon monarchs (such as Egbert of Wessex) and later monarchs such as King Canute and William Rufus,  as well as Jane Austen. It was once an important pilgrimage centre and housed the shrine of Saint Swithun. The ancient Pilgrims' Way travelling to Canterbury begins at Winchester. The plan of the earlier Old Minster is laid out in the grass adjoining the cathedral. The New Minster (original burial place ofAlfred the Great and Edward the Elder ) once stood beside it. It has a girls choir and a boys choir, which sing on a regular basis at the cathedral.

Winchester Cathedral Close contains a number of historic buildings from the time when the cathedral was also a priory. Of particular note is the Deanery, which dates back to the thirteenth century. It was originally the Prior's House, and was the birthplace of Arthur, Prince of Wales, in 1486. Not far away is Cheyney Court, a mid fifteenth-century timber-framed house incorporating the Porter's Lodge for the Priory Gate. It was the Bishop's court house.

The earliest hammer-beamed building still standing in England is also situated in the Cathedral Close, next to the Dean's garden. It is known as the Pilgrims' Hall, as it was part of the hostelry used to accommodate the many pilgrims to Saint Swithun's shrine. Left-overs from the lavish banquets of the Dean would be given to the pilgrims who were welcome to spend the night in the hall. It is thought by Winchester City Council to have been built in 1308. Now part of The Pilgrims' School, the hall is used by the school for assemblies in the morning, drama lessons, plays, orchestral practices, Cathedral Waynflete rehearsals, the school's Senior Commoners' Choir rehearsals and so forth.


Wolvesey Castle and Palace



Wolvesey Castle was the Norman bishop's palace, dating from 1110, but standing on the site of an earlier Saxon structure. It was enhanced by Henry de Blois during the Anarchy of his brother King Stephen's reign. He was besieged there for some days. In the 16th century, Queen Mary Tudor and King Philip II of Spain were guests just prior to their wedding in the Cathedral. The building is now a ruin (maintained by English Heritage), but the chapel was incorporated into the new palace built in the 1680s, only one wing of which survives. 



 

  The "Winchester Round Table" in The Great Hall of Winchester Castle



Hospital of St Cross


 
The almshouses and vast Norman chapel of Hospital of St Cross were founded just outside the city centre by Henry de Blois in the 1130s. Since at least the 14th century, and still available today, a 'wayfarer's dole' of ale and bread has been handed out there. It was supposedly instigated to aid pilgrims on their way to Canterbury.

City museum


The City Museum, located on the corner of Great Minster St and The Square, contains much information on the history of Winchester. Early examples of Winchester measures of standard capacity are on display. The museum was one of the first purpose-built museums to be constructed outside London. Local items featured include the Roman 'Venta' gallery, and some genuine period shop interiors taken from the nearby High Street. Other places of cultural interest include the Westgate Museum (which showcases various items ofweaponry), and the Historic Resources Centre, which holds many records related to the history of the city. In 2014 ownership of the City museum was transferred to the Hampshire Cultural Trust as part of a larger transfer of museums from Hampshire County Council and Winchester City Council.

Other buildings



Other important historic buildings include the Guildhall dating from 1871 in the Gothic revival style, the Royal Hampshire County Hospital designed by William Butterfield and Winchester City Mill, one of the city's several water mills driven by the River Itchen that run through the city centre. The mill has recently been restored, and is again milling corn by water power. It is owned by the National Trust.

Although Winchester City survived World War II intact, about thirty percent of the Old Town was demolished to make way for buildings more suited to modern day office requirements (in particular for Hampshire County Council and Winchester City Council). Since the late 1980s the city has seen a gradual replacement of these post-war brutalist structures by contemporary developments more sympathetic to the medieval urban fabric of the Old Town.






 

  Winchester Guildhall, built in 1871



 

Education


Primary schools

Winchester has a variety of Church of England primary schools, including both state and private provision schools. St Peters Catholic Primary School had the highest SATS results, after achieving a perfect score of 300 in 2011. Compton Primary School follows a close second and then Micheldever C of E, which is located just outside the city.


Secondary schools


There are three state comprehensive secondary schools in Winchester; the  Henry Beaufort SchoolKings' School Winchester and The Westgate School are all situated in the city. A fourth specialist state school, the Osborne School is also located in Winchester.


Independent schools


Among the independent junior/preparatory schools, there are The Pilgrims' School Winchester, the Prince's Mead School and Twyford School, which is situated just outside of the city and claims to be the oldest preparatory school in the United Kingdom. There are also two major independent senior schools in Winchester. These schools include the St Swithun's (a day and boarding school for girls from nursery to sixth form) and the Winchester College, a boys' public school founded by William of Wykeham. Winchester College still occupies its original buildings dating from 1382; two courtyards, gatehouse, cloister, hall and a large college chapel. The college expanded considerably in Victorian and later times, and now has 10 boarding houses in addition to "College" for the scholars. It also owns "The Water Meadows", through which the River Itchen runs. The college sets its own entrance exams.

Both schools often top the examination result tables for the city and county



 


                         Winchester college War Cloister


 

Tertiary, further and higher education




The University of Winchester (formerly King Alfred's College) is a public university based in Winchester and the surrounding area. The University origins go back as far as 1840—originally as a Diocesan teacher training centre. King Alfred's, the main campus, is located on a purpose built campus near the city centre. The newly completed West Downs is a short walk away, and houses student facilities and accommodation and the business school.

The Winchester School of Art was founded in the 1860s as an independent institution and is now a school of the University of Southampton.

Peter Symonds College is the main college that serves Winchester and is one of the region's more highly rated sixth form colleges. It began as a Grammar School for boys in 1897, and became a co-educational Sixth-form college, now one of the largest in the country, in 1974. The original foundation goes back to a charity established by the will of a wealthy local merchant in 1607.




Transport



Road


Winchester is located near the M3 motorway and at the meeting of the A34A31A3090 and A272 roads. Once a major traffic bottleneck, the city still suffers from congestion at peak times. It is just to the south of the A303 and A30, which is the major gateway to the West Country.



Roman road




Roman road originating in Salisbury called The Clarendon Way ends in Winchester. The Clarendon Way is now a recreational footpath. 

 






 source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winchester

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  



 

 

 

 

 

 

Winchester



Winchester is a city and the county town of Hampshire. The city lies at the heart of the wider City of Winchester, a local government district, and is located at the western end of the South Downs National Park, along the course of the River Itchen.It is situated 68 miles (109 km) south-west of London and 13.6 miles (21.9 km) from Southampton, its other closest city. At the time of the 2001 Census, Winchester had a population of 41,420.

Winchester developed from the Roman town of Venta Belgarum, which developed from an Iron Age oppidum. Winchester's major landmark is Winchester Cathedral, one of the largest cathedrals in Europe, with the distinction of having the longest nave and overall length of all Gothic cathedrals in Europe. The city is also home to the University of Winchester and Winchester College the oldest public school in the United Kingdom still to be using its original buildings. The city's architectural and historic interest, and its fast links to other towns and cities have led Winchester to become one of the most expensive and desirable areas of the country. The demonym for a person from Winchester is "Wintonian".



Winchester 13.JPG
    
     Winchester city centre from St Giles's Hill 




Landmarks



Cathedral



Winchester Cathedral was originally built in 1079 and remains the longest cathedral in Europe. It contains much fine architecture spanning the 11th to the 16th century and is the place of interment of numerous Bishops of Winchester (such as William of Wykeham), Anglo-Saxon monarchs (such as Egbert of Wessex) and later monarchs such as King Canute and William Rufus,  as well as Jane Austen. It was once an important pilgrimage centre and housed the shrine of Saint Swithun. The ancient Pilgrims' Way travelling to Canterbury begins at Winchester. The plan of the earlier Old Minster is laid out in the grass adjoining the cathedral. The New Minster (original burial place ofAlfred the Great and Edward the Elder ) once stood beside it. It has a girls choir and a boys choir, which sing on a regular basis at the cathedral.

Winchester Cathedral Close contains a number of historic buildings from the time when the cathedral was also a priory. Of particular note is the Deanery, which dates back to the thirteenth century. It was originally the Prior's House, and was the birthplace of Arthur, Prince of Wales, in 1486. Not far away is Cheyney Court, a mid fifteenth-century timber-framed house incorporating the Porter's Lodge for the Priory Gate. It was the Bishop's court house.

The earliest hammer-beamed building still standing in England is also situated in the Cathedral Close, next to the Dean's garden. It is known as the Pilgrims' Hall, as it was part of the hostelry used to accommodate the many pilgrims to Saint Swithun's shrine. Left-overs from the lavish banquets of the Dean would be given to the pilgrims who were welcome to spend the night in the hall. It is thought by Winchester City Council to have been built in 1308. Now part of The Pilgrims' School, the hall is used by the school for assemblies in the morning, drama lessons, plays, orchestral practices, Cathedral Waynflete rehearsals, the school's Senior Commoners' Choir rehearsals and so forth.


Wolvesey Castle and Palace

Wolvesey Castle was the Norman bishop's palace, dating from 1110, but standing on the site of an earlier Saxon structure. It was enhanced by Henry de Blois during the Anarchy of his brother King Stephen's reign. He was besieged there for some days. In the 16th century, Queen Mary Tudor and King Philip II of Spain were guests just prior to their wedding in the Cathedral. The building is now a ruin (maintained by English Heritage), but the chapel was incorporated into the new palace built in the 1680s, only one wing of which survives. 



 

     The "Winchester Round Table" in The Great Hall of Winchester Castle



Hospital of St Cross


 

almshouses and vast Norman chapel of Hospital of St Cross were founded just outside the city centre by Henry de Blois in the 1130s. Since at least the 14th century, and still available today, a 'wayfarer's dole' of ale and bread has been handed out there. It was supposedly instigated to aid pilgrims on their way to Canterbury.


City museum


The City Museum, located on the corner of Great Minster St and The Square, contains much information on the history of Winchester. Early examples of Winchester measures of standard capacity are on display. The museum was one of the first purpose-built museums to be constructed outside London. Local items featured include the Roman 'Venta' gallery, and some genuine period shop interiors taken from the nearby High Street. Other places of cultural interest include the Westgate Museum (which showcases various items ofweaponry), and the Historic Resources Centre, which holds many records related to the history of the city. In 2014 ownership of the City museum was transferred to the Hampshire Cultural Trust as part of a larger transfer of museums from Hampshire County Council and Winchester City Council.

Other buildings



Other important historic buildings include the Guildhall dating from 1871 in the Gothic revival style, the Royal Hampshire County Hospital designed by William Butterfield and Winchester City Mill, one of the city's several water mills driven by the River Itchen that run through the city centre. The mill has recently been restored, and is again milling corn by water power. It is owned by the National Trust.

Although Winchester City survived World War II intact, about thirty percent of the Old Town was demolished to make way for buildings more suited to modern day office requirements (in particular for Hampshire County Council and Winchester City Council). Since the late 1980s the city has seen a gradual replacement of these post-war brutalist structures by contemporary developments more sympathetic to the medieval urban fabric of the Old Town.


 


                    Winchester Guildhall, built in 1871



 

Education


Primary schools

Winchester has a variety of Church of England primary schools, including both state and private provision schools. St Peters Catholic Primary School had the highest SATS results, after achieving a perfect score of 300 in 2011. Compton Primary School follows a close second and then Micheldever C of E, which is located just outside the city.


Secondary schools


There are three state comprehensive secondary schools in Winchester; theHenry Beaufort SchoolKings' School Winchester and The Westgate School are all situated in the city. A fourth specialist state school, the Osborne School is also located in Winchester.


Independent schools


Among the independent junior/preparatory schools, there are The Pilgrims' SchoolWinchester, the Prince's Mead School and Twyford School, which is situated just outside of the city and claims to be the oldest preparatory school in the United Kingdom. There are also two major independent senior schools in Winchester. These schools include the St Swithun's (a day and boarding school for girls from nursery to sixth form) and the Winchester College, a boys' public school founded by William of Wykeham. Winchester College still occupies its original buildings dating from 1382; two courtyards, gatehouse, cloister, hall and a large college chapel. The college expanded considerably in Victorian and later times, and now has 10 boarding houses in addition to "College" for the scholars. It also owns "The Water Meadows", through which the River Itchen runs. The college sets its own entrance exams.

Both schools often top the examination result tables for the city and county



 


                                                   Winchester college War Cloister


 

Tertiary, further and higher education




The University of Winchester (formerly King Alfred's College) is a public university based in Winchester and the surrounding area. The University origins go back as far as 1840—originally as a Diocesan teacher training centre. King Alfred's, the main campus, is located on a purpose built campus near the city centre. The newly completed West Downs is a short walk away, and houses student facilities and accommodation and the business school.

The Winchester School of Art was founded in the 1860s as an independent institution and is now a school of the University of Southampton.

Peter Symonds College is the main college that serves Winchester and is one of the region's more highly rated sixth form colleges. It began as a Grammar School for boys in 1897, and became a co-educational Sixth-form college, now one of the largest in the country, in 1974. The original foundation goes back to a charity established by the will of a wealthy local merchant in 1607.




Transport



Road


Winchester is located near the M3 motorway and at the meeting of the A34A31A3090 and A272 roads. Once a major traffic bottleneck, the city still suffers from congestion at peak times. It is just to the south of the A303 and A30, which is the major gateway to the West Country.



Roman road

Roman road originating in Salisbury called The Clarendon Way ends in Winchester. The Clarendon Way is now a recreational footpath. 

 






 source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winchester

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  



 

 

 

 

 

 

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