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About Worthing

Worthing, England







Worthing (/ˈwɜrðɪŋ/ werdh-ing) is a large seaside town with borough status in West Sussex, in the historic county of Sussex. It is situated at the foot of the South Downs, 10 miles (16 km) west of Brighton, and 18 miles (29 km) east of the county town of Chichester. With an estimated population of 104,600 and an area of 12.5 square miles (32.37 km2) the borough is the second largest component of the Brighton/Worthing/Littlehampton conurbation, which makes it part of the 12th most populous urban area in the United Kingdom.

The area around Worthing has been populated for at least 6,000 years and contains Britain's greatest concentration of Stone Age flint mines, which are some of the earliest mines in Europe. Lying within the borough, the Iron Age hill fort of Cissbury Ring is one of Britain's largest. Worthing means "(place of) Worth/Worō's people", from the Old English personal name Worth/Worō (the name means "valiant one, one who is noble"), and -ingas "people of" (reduced to -ing in the modern name). For many centuries Worthing was a small mackerel fishing hamlet until in the late 18th century it developed into an elegant Georgian seaside resort and attracted the well-known and wealthy of the day. In the 19th and 20th centuries the area was one of Britain's chief market gardening centres.

Modern Worthing has a large service industry, particularly in financial services. It has three theatres and one of Britain's oldest cinemas. Writers Oscar Wilde and Harold Pinter lived and worked in the town.









View of the Seafront from Worthing Pier
View of theSeafront from Worthing Pier









Official logo of Worthing
Coat of Arms of the Borough Council








History
 

The backfilled remains of a flint mine shaft, one of about 270 mine shafts at Cissbury. From around 4000BC, the South Downs above Worthing was Britain's earliest and largest flint-mining area.
 

From around 4000BC, the South Downs above Worthing was Britain's earliest and largest flint-mining area. with four of the UK's 14 known flint mines lying within 7 miles (11 kilometres) of the centre of Worthing. An excavation at Little High Street dates the earliest remains from Worthing town centre to the Bronze Age. There is also an important Bronze Age hill fort on the western fringes of the modern borough at Highdown Hill. During the Iron Age, one of Britain's largest hill forts was built at Cissbury Ring. The area was part of the civitas of the Regni during the Romano-British period. Several of the borough's roads date from this era and lie in a grid layout known as 'centuriation'. A Romano-British farmstead once stood in the centre of the town, at a site close to the town hall. In the 5th and 6th centuries, the area became part of the kingdom of Sussex. The place names of the area, including the name Worthing itself, date from this period.












Etymology
 

Worthing means "(place of) Worth/Weorð/Worō's people", from the Old English personal name WorthWeorð or Worō (meaning "valiant one, one who is noble"), and -ingas (meaning "people of", and reduced to -ing in the modern name). The name was first recorded as Weoroingas in Old English; then as Ordinges in the Domesday Book of 1086, Wuroininege in 1183, Wurdingg in 1218, Wording or Wurthing in 1240, Worthinges in 1288 and Wyrthyng in 1397. Worthen was used as late as 1720. The modern name was first documented in 1297.

Another village with a similar name near Emmen in Drenthe in the Northeastern part of the Netherlands is Weerdinge.

Older local people sometimes claim that the name of Worthing is derived from a natural annual phenomenon. Seaweed beds off nearby Bognor Regis are ripped up by summer storms and prevailing Atlantic currents deposit it on the beach. A rich source of nitrates, it makes good fertiliser. The decaying weed was sought by farmers from the surrounding area. Thus the town would have become known as Wort (weed) -inge(people).







Governance

Built in 1933, Worthing Town Hall replaced the town's original Georgian town hall as the headquarters of Worthing Borough Council
 

Worthing was incorporated as a municipal borough in 1890, when the towns absorbed the neighbouring civil parish of Heene. Subsequent enlargements took place in 1902, 1929 and 1933 before being reincorporated as a borough in 1974 under the Local Government Act 1972. Since its inception as a borough, the authority has granted freedom of the town to some 18 individuals.

The borough's coat of arms includes three silver mackerel, a Horn of Plenty overflowing with corn and fruit on a cloth of gold, and the figure of a woman, considered likely to be Hygieia, the ancient Greek goddess of health, holding a snake. The images represent the health given from the seas, the fullness and riches gained from the earth and the power of healing.

Worthing's motto is the Latin Ex terra copiam e mari salutem, which translates as 'From the land plenty and from the sea health'.







Geography
 

The summit of Cissbury Ring, the highest point in Worthing.
 

Worthing is situated on the West Sussex coast in South East England, 49 miles (79 km) south of London and 10 miles (16 km) west of Brighton and Hove. It forms part of the Brighton/Worthing/Littlehampton conurbation along with neighbouring towns and villages in the county such as LittlehamptonFindonSomptingLancingShoreham-by-Sea and Southwick. The area is the United Kingdom's twelfth largest conurbation, with a population of over 460,000. The borough of Worthing is bordered by the West Sussex local authority districts of Arun in the north and west, and Adur in the east. The town is dominated by the Downs to the north: Cissbury Ring, a Site of Special Scientific Interest, rises to 184 metres (604 ft) in the north of the borough. A further high point is at West Hill (139m) north-west of High Salvington

Lying on the south coast of England, Worthing is situated on a mix of two beds of sedimentary rock. The large part of the town, including the town centre is built upon chalk (part of the Chalk Group), with a bed of London clay found in a band heading west from Lancing through Broadwater and Durrington. There are no major rivers within the borough, however the culverted Teville Stream begins as a spring in what is now allotments in Tarring, runs along Tarring Road and Teville Road north of the town centre, passing to the east through Homefield Park and Davison High School before meeting the sea at Brooklands where the Broadwater Brook meets the sea. To the west and also in parts culverted, Ferring Rife rises in Durrington near Littlehampton Road, passing through Maybridge, then west of Ferring into the sea.







Religion
 

A Classical style, stuccoed building whose façade is dominated by four tapering columns supporting a pediment. The side wall is yellow brick. Partly hidden behind the columns are two red round-headed doors. Above the pediment is a partly hidden cupola. A modern extension is partly visible to the right.
 Saint Paul's Church of England was Worthing's first Anglican church.
Three-quarter view of a stone church with a buttressed tower in the foreground. This has small battlements and a spire. The nave roof, below which are four small, evenly spaced windows, is visible, but its aisle and an attached porch are obscured by a bush. There are gravestones and a table tomb in the foreground.
St Andrew's Church is the parish church of West Tarring.
 
A brown-brick, flat-roofed, warehouse-style building. The lower half of its façade has been painted cream and decorated with arch-shaped window and door surrounds attached to the walls. On the first floor there are three two-pane windows and one single window. The side wall is mostly blank, with some small windows.
The Masjid Assalam mosque serves the town's Sunni Muslim population.

The borough of Worthing has about 50 active Christian places of worship. There is also a mosque, which follows the Sunni tradition. There are also 16 former church buildings which are either disused or in secular use.

Worthing's first Anglican church, St Paul's, was built in 1812; previously, worshippers had to travel to the ancient parish church of BroadwaterJohn Rebecca's classical-style building became structurally unsound and closed in 1995. The austere design was well regarded at first, but architectural writers have since criticised it. Its importance derives from its status as "the spiritual and social centre around which the town developed". Residential growth in the 19th century led to several other Anglican churches opening in the town centre: Christ Church was started in 1840 and survived a closure threat in 2006; Arthur Blomfield's St Andrew's Church brought the controversial "High Church" form of worship to the town in the 1880s—its "Worthing Madonna" icon was particularly notorious; and Holy Trinity church opened at the same time but with less dispute. Other Anglican churches were built in the 20th century to serve new residential areas such as High Salvington and Maybridge; and the ancient villages which were absorbed into Worthing Borough between 1890 and 1929 each had their own church: Broadwater's had Saxon origins, St Mary's at Goring-by-Sea was Norman (although it was rebuilt in 1837) St Andrew'sat West Tarring was 13th century, and St Botolph's at Heene and St Symphorian's at Durrington were rebuilt from medieval ruins. All of the borough's churches are in the Rural Deanery of Worthing and the Diocese of Chichester.

The first Roman Catholic church in Worthing opened in 1864; the centrally located St Mary of the Angels Church has since been joined by others at East Worthing, Goring-by-Sea and High Salvington. All are in Worthing Deanery in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Arundel and Brighton. Protestant Nonconformismhas a long history in Worthing: the town's first place of worship was an Independent chapel. Methodists,Baptists, the United Reformed Church and Evangelical Christian groups each have several churches in the borough, and other denominations represented include ChristadelphiansChristian ScientistsJehovah's WitnessesMormons and Plymouth Brethren. The Salvation Army have been established for more than a century, but their arrival in Worthing prompted large-scale riots involving a group called the Skeleton Army. These continued intermittently for several years in the 1880s.

Worthing's Churches Together organisation, currently chaired by Nigel O'Dwyer, encouragesecumenical work and links between the town's churches. Church leaders meet regularly to pray for the town and to organise events together through PrayerNet. A townwide youth service, CrossRoads, brings together young people from all denominations. New Song Cafe performs a similar function for the town's church musicians. Other Christian organisations include Worthing Churches Homeless Projects and Street Pastors. In October 2009, a Mission Festival Weekend was held to celebrate the range of mission agencies based in Worthing; the centrepiece was a parade from Worthing Pier to St Paul's Church.








Education

Worthing has 22 primary schools, five secondary schools, one primary and secondary special school, two independent schools, one sixth form college and one college of higher and further education. Schools in the borough are provided by West Sussex County Council. Broadly speaking, the town has a system of First-Middle-High progression, and so the 22 primary schools are made up of a combination of first, middle and combined schools. In 2012, a consultation was underway to review whether to continue this policy or adopt a policy of transferring to secondary schools at the age of 11 as elsewhere in West Sussex. Our Lady Of Sion Junior School, an independent school, was the most successful secondary school in Worthing for GCSE results in 2012: 100% of pupils gained five or more GCSEs at A* to C grade.  Durrington High School was the highest achieving state school with 58%, closely followed by Davison High School with 52%. Worthing High School and St Andrews School achieved 48% and the worst performing school was Chatsmore Catholic High School where only 43% of students achieved five or more A* to C grade results.

With two campuses in Worthing and another at nearby Shoreham Airport,  Northbrook College has around 16,000 full-time and part-time students and is an affiliate college of  Brighton University. Its West Durrington campus is referred to as University Centre Worthing and it provides Higher Education to around 1,000 students, most of whom study art and design. In 2012, Northbrook College announced plans to begin the second phase of a multi-million pound redevelopment of its Broadwater campus. The town's sixth form college,  Worthing College announced plans to move in 2013 to a new campus located at the Warren covering 8 hectares (20 acres) and the move took place at the beginning of the 2013-2014 academic year with the previous site being used for housing.







Open spaces
 

Lake at Brooklands Park

The town contains a considerable number of parks and gardens, many laid out in the Victorian and Edwardian eras.

  • Beach House Park
  • Beach House Park – named after nearby Beach House, the park is home to one of the world's most well-known venues for the sport of bowls. The park is also home to a possibly unique memorial to homing pigeons that served in the Second World War.
  • Broadwater Green – Broadwater's 'village green'.
  • Brooklands Park
  • Denton Gardens – at the southern end of Denton Gardens is an 18 Hole Crazy Golf Course
  • Field Place – tennis courts, lawn bowls, putting and conference facilities. Can be found north of Worthing Leisure Centre.
  • Goring Green
  • Highdown Gardens – a beautiful garden at the foot of the South Downs, deemed to be of national importance.
  • Homefield Park – formerly known as the 'People's Park' it was once home to Worthing F.C.
  • Liverpool Gardens – overlooking the graceful Georgian Liverpool Terrace, the gardens and terrace are named after Lord Liverpool. Overlooking the park from the east are four bronze heads known as Desert Quartet, sculpted by Dame Elisabeth Frink.
  • Marine Gardens
  • Palatine Park
  • Promenade Waterwise Garden
  • Steyne Gardens – which includes a sunken garden re-landscaped in 2007 with a fountain of the Ancient Greek sea god, Triton, by sculptor William Bloye.
  • Victoria Park – was donated by the Heene Estate to the poor of Worthing in commemoration of the death of Queen Victoria. (Taken from title deeds to property owned in St. Matthews Road.) The land was previously used for market gardening and once sported a paddling pool which was closed due to foot infections in the children. Victoria Park is very popular for club and casual footballers.
  • West Park – has a running track and basketball court and lies next to Worthing Leisure Centre.







Sport
 

Worthing's location between the sea and the downs makes the area a popular location for outdoor recreation. Its wide open water and five miles of coastline provides for many types of watersport, especially catamaran racing, windsurfing and kitesurfing and the town has held a regatta forrowing since at least 1859.

The South Downs is popular for hiking and mountain-biking, with around 22 trail-heads within the borough. Two of Worthing's three golf clubs, including Worthing Golf Club are also located on the Downs, which is also the location for the Three Forts Marathon, a 27-mile ultramarathon from Broadwater to the three Iron Age hill forts of Cissbury Ring, Chanctonbury Ring and Devil's Dyke.

Worthing F.C., nicknamed "The Rebels", is the town's main football club which formed in 1886. They play in the Isthmian League Division One SouthWorthing United F.C. who are nicknamed 'the "Mavericks" play in the Division One of the Sussex County League.

Worthing Hockey Club was formed in 1896 and has a number of teams. The home pitches are at Manor Sports Ground.

Home to Bowls England, Worthing is, with Johannesburg, one of only two locations in the world to have hosted the men's World Bowls Championships twice. The events were held in 1972 and 1992, both at Beach House Park, which is sometimes known as the spiritual home of bowls, and is also the venue for the annual National Championships each August.

Denton Gardens is home to an 18 Hole Mini Golf Course which is due to host the British Masters Mini Golf Championships in April 2012.







SOURCE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worthing 

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